Moomah the Magazine
Meet the Makers: A Travel Journal

Meet the Makers: A Travel Journal

In the search for handmade pieces to sell in their online marketplace, Lauren and Hannah from The Little Market travel the world to meet with local artisan women who are working to support their families and gain access to a bigger marketplace. This March they took a trip to Guatemala to meet with local artisan group, Wakami.

"Wakami fosters economic initiatives in rural communities in Guatemala through fair trade. The organization serves as a bridge, connecting artisans in impoverished, remote areas with marketplaces. Ninety percent of the 550 artisans are women who are able to work from home while caring for their families. Wakami also provides a support network, meeting nutritional needs with organic gardens, home needs with solar energy and water filters, and income needs with business training programs."

Take a look at the travel diary Lauren and Hannah shared with us, showing photos of their trip to Guatemala and giving us a behind the scenes look at the Wakami women hard at work.

HANNAH AND LAUREN WALKING TO AN ARTISAN’S HOME IN GUATEMALA.

HANNAH SPORTING A HANDMADE SATCHEL FROM THE LITTLE MARKET.

WOMEN ARTISANS OF WAKAMI MEET UP AT A HOME TO MAKE BRACELETS TOGETHER.  INCOME FROM THE SALES OF THESE BRACELETS GENERATE MUCH NEEDED INCOME FOR THE ARTISANS AND THEIR FAMILIES.

ONE OF THE ARTISANS AT WAKAMI SKILLFULLY MAKING A BRACELET.

THE WOMEN ARTISANS OF WAKAMI SOCIALIZE AS THEY MAKE BRACELETS TOGETHER.

LAUREN MAKES TORTILLAS WITH THE ARTISANS OF WAKAMI.

HANNAH AND LAUREN LEARN HOW TO MAKE FRESH TORTILLAS AT THE ARTISAN’S HOME.

AN ARTISAN FROM WAKAMI WITH HER DAUGHTER. HER DAUGHTER WAS THE FIRST IN HER FAMILY TO GO TO HIGH SCHOOL.

HANNAH AND LAUREN SMILING WITH A GROUP OF WAKAMI ARTISANS IN GUATEMALA.

THESE ARE SOME OF OUR FAVORITE BRACELETS MADE BY THE WAKAMI WOMEN AND AVAILABLE AT THE LITTLE MARKET:


WAKAMI AND THE LITTLE MARKET

HOW DOES THE LITTLE MARKET PROTECT THEIR ARTISANS?

The Little Market follows a strong set of values when it comes to choosing the artisan groups they work with and the products they sell. 

• Fair Trade - They partner with artisan groups who demonstrate a real commitment to their artisans’ welfare and work with artisan partners to ensure that fair trade practices are in place and respected.

• Fair Wages - They purchase artisans’ products at fair trade prices that provide a living wage and pay the artisans promptly, knowing that families rely on the income to meet immediate needs. 

• Safe Workplace - They work with artisan collectives that create safe and healthy working environments for the artisans. The groups must ensure the artisans’ safety and comply with or exceed national and local labor laws and standards related to hours, workplace conditions, and child labor laws.

• Community Development - They work with groups of artisans that work actively to improve the quality of life in their villages and towns through community investment and development. Their groups give back to their communities in a number of ways including: support education for children, literacy for adults, healthcare, and human rights training in their villages and towns.

• Employment of Women - They work with artisans to provide greater opportunity for women. Artisans are empowered to work and care for their families while moving toward economic independence and self-sufficiency.

(PHOTO CREDIT: THE LITTLE MARKET)

Posted in: Discover & Learn   

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