Moomah the Magazine
How can we live sustainable lives?

How can we live sustainable lives?

Sustainable living refers to the homes we live in, the foods we eat, the businesses we buy from, the way we use our water, our power, our transport and dispose of our waste. But when we think of these areas and all the changes we would need to make in order to live completely sustainable lives, it's no surprise that we become completely overwhelmed!

We are asking experts from all aspects of life to share how they live sustainable lives and advice on how we can make one simple change to live a sustainable life of our own.


 

MEG PASKA
FARMER, BEEKEEPER AND AUTHOR

HOW DO YOU PRACTICE SUSTAINABLE LIVING?

I choose to farm with sustainability in mind, using processes that are regenerative to soil and to native biology, to grow an assortment of crops that benefit one another and can feed people in my local community an interesting array of foods throughout the season. On the farm, we don't spray chemical fungicides, pesticides or herbicides. Instead, we use known biological tactics to minimize disease and pests. Planting for beneficial insects, crop rotation, heavy mulching with aged manure and compost, fertilizing and spraying milk and kelp on crops to manage diseases, are all ways we keep our farm healthy and growing.

Advice:
Try to learn to live with less. Let go of the "disposable" mentality. Buy finer quality items made by artisans that will last for generations. Purchase from the person who made or grew it as often as possible. Eat in season. Tomatoes in the wintertime taste terrible anyway! Develop a relationship with local farmers so you can buy in bulk. Learn to can and preserve the crops that are seasonal that you just can't live without. It's a fun activity to do with kids and you'll always know what's in the food you're feeding them.

View Farmer Meg's Digest >>

Photo Credit: Alex Brown Photography
 

AIDA KOSKI
PRIVATE CHEF AND MOM

HOW DO YOU PRACTICE SUSTAINABLE LIVING?
I shop on average three to four times per week. I buy what we need and  intend to eat.  So much food is wasted simply because it has spoiled and can’t be consumed. I buy organic whenever possible and support local farmers which is vital to minimizing fuel blueprint on our environment. At any given time, I carry in my purse three foldable, featherweight grocery bags.  When ever I buy groceries or clothing for that matter, I unfold these lightweight shopping bags and eliminate the need for paper of plastic from any vendor.

Advice:
As a mom, I’m aware that messes will happen, and often. Make a concerted effort to use little or no paper towels.  I love the super absorbent kitchen towels.  We use and reuse them everywhere in our home. When dining, try to use cloth napkins only.  I’ve instilled this habit early on with our kids.  Keep hand and dish towels easily accessible.

When in the kitchen, remember to turn the tap off! One of my pet peeves is allowing tap water to run.  Most people are aware of saving water, but often times in the kitchen, water runs while washing dishes.  Soaking and washing while faucet is off and rinse is both efficient and saves water. Recycle glass containers to store left over foods and cut out the plastic disposable ones. There is no fear of plastic leaking harmful chemicals into your food.



 

SUSIE COSTON
NATIONAL SHELTER DIRECTOR AT FARM SANCTUARY

HOW DO YOU PRACTICE SUSTAINALBE LIVING?
I personally practice sustainable living by eating a plant based diet.  With the growing number of people on the planet, the lack of usable land and the already taxed environment, eating animal products is not sustainable and big changes will need to happen in the future if we are to keep our bodies and our planet healthy.  Our current food system is not working but was designed because of the demand for cheap milk, eggs and meat.  Sadly this system is not only cruel but it is destroying the physical world we live in.  The current system of factory farming was designed because there is not enough land to raise animals as we did hundreds of years ago but this system of farming is bad for the planet, bad for the animals and bad for the humans working at these farms.


Advice:
Plant based foods are healthy and cruelty free so if you eat meat think about reducing your meat intake or cutting it out altogether. Learn as much as you can about our current food system and the damage it is causing and make choices that are best for yourself and our world.

Learn more about "Farm Animal Whisperer” Susie Coston >>

Photo Credit, Susie w/sheep: Jo-Anne McArthur.
Photo Credit, Susie w/ pigs: Derek Goodwin.



 

SUMMER RAYNE OAKES
ENVIRONMENTAL ACTIVIST AND SUSTAINABILITY STRATEGIST

HOW DO YOU PRACTICE SUSTAINABLE LIVING?
Once I moved to the city, I realized how much I missed the gardens that I grew up with as a kid. I now grow both horticultural and edible plants indoors and do bokashi composting, which is a Japanese form of composting that safely "pickles" waste.

Advice:
I think it's easiest to start with activities that we do every day - like bettering the way we eat, what we wear, what we put on our bodies and how we get around.
 

Learn more about Summer Rayne Oakes >>



 

JOSH MORGENTHAU
FARMER AND GOOD EGGS NEW YORK CITY LEAD

HOW DO YOU PRACTICE SUSTAINABLE LIVING?
Eating real food made with locally-grown ingredients is the number one way I live a sustainable life. We have to face that the industrial-scale agriculture is damaging to the environment and our health. It's responsible for about a third of all greenhouse gas emissions. So I don't think you can look at sustainability without looking at food. On the other hand, food raised the right way by small farms is better in every way, including freshness and taste. For me, it's about supporting the companies that share my values and are making a positive impact in their local communities every day.

Advice:
Buy and eat locally. Purchase your produce from local farms and support small farmers.

Learn more about Josh and Fishkill Farms >>

Posted in: Discover & Learn   

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