Moomah the Magazine

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Animals transform our lives. Inspired by them we are often capable of great accomplishments. Other times we make mistakes with the best intentions in mind. The more we learn the better we can do.We’re eager to hear your stories, your triumphs and your mistakes so that we can all be inspired to do better unto animals. When we learn more we love more and we love better. 


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Rick Obwald, San Carlos, Ca.

I volunteer at our local humane society, PHS-SPCA in Burlingame & San Mateo, helping with dogs, cats, wildlife, etc. One of my duties is helping out at the Furchandise Store, which is the pet store inside our adoption center, and yesterday I noticed that we will be putting your book out for sale soon, so naturally, I had to check it out. I'm only a few chapters in, and just love how it's put together so far. But what really grabbed me was the chapter on Christopher Robin, the dog you rescued that had his ears cut off. My wife and I rescued a very similar dog 5 years ago. Her name is Stella Blue, an AmStaff Pitty Bull. Stella Blue and I wrote some poems together, and if I did it right with the thumbnail above, you'll see and read the Poem Package I give away at the Furchandise Store on the days I volunteer there. She is also lovingly known as "The Dog With No Ears" because of the poems. Anyway, I just wanted to share our experience we're having with her. And by the way, it seems like whoever did this to her may have intended her to fight dogs, but then bred her instead and then left her in a park when they were through with her. And that's when Stella's luck changed!

Elaine Graham, Poulsbo, WA 98370

4-H was my path to becoming a vegetarian. I grew up on a farm in So. Oregon & raised several pigs for 4-H during the late 1950s. After several years of fairs & my pigs being sold at auction, I became increasingly agitated at the idea of "fair-time."; However, it was not until 40 years later that I was able to identify the source of my discomfort. When that light-bulb moment hit, it was life-altering. In short, I truly understood the meaning of the word "betrayal"; Having bonded so intimately with my pigs & gaining their trust, friendship and companionship only to betray all of that by sending them to market, was such a sobering insight, that I could no longer be a party to consuming meat, poultry or fish of any kind. Nor can I any longer support 4-H. To this day, guilt haunts me for all those betrayals. My passion for the rest of my life is to be a role-model for future generations.
J-Coby Wayne Story Submission

J-Coby Wayne, The Adirondacks, NY

I have been around animals all my life as well as being a vegan for more than 15 years. But it was just this past weekend that I got to have such a special experience with animals that I am inspired to share. I attended the "Celebration for the Turkeys" at The Farm Sanctuary in Watkins Glen, NY - something I had been wanting to do for years. The whole day was magical, but one experience was very high impact: The Celebration for the Turkeys itself and the manifestation of what I know is all of humanity's eventual future. It was such an honor to be part of humanity cherishing, honoring and stewarding so tenderly these rescued turkeys as guests of honor rather than dinner. In my work of co-creating and co-stewarding world collaboratives for good that help humanity, the planet and all lives thrive and evolve together through an understanding that we are all living energy and, thus, one, I know that humanity shares a primary purposes of being a steward, guide and recognizer of the purpose of the animal, planet and mineral kingdoms. When humanity recognizes this, all people will cherish animals the way the 300 guests were able to do during the Celebration for the Turkeys. That day, for a few hours, all these people were able to come together in an act of the inherent compassion that is humanity's essential nature and its inevitable bright future. A truly life-changing experience that brought tears to my eyes and filled my heart to bursting, especially for the kiddos there who will hopefully grow up to be champions of the animal kingdom through the impact of their early memories on a cold day in November where the beloved turkeys ate from their hands extended in love and wonder.
Teresa Rhyne Story Submission

Teresa Rhyne, Riverside, CA

I adopted three beagles who have changed my life. The first, Seamus, was diagnosed with cancer at 2 years old. They told me that with surgery and chemotherapy he would live maybe a year. They were wrong. Three years later he was still by my side when I was diagnosed with breast cancer. I followed his lead and made it through. When Seamus did pass away at the age of 11 from a second battle with cancer, I was devastated and fearful my cancer would also return. After all "the dog lived and so will I" had been my mantra as I went through treatment, and now he was gone. I was saved from my grief by a second beagle, Daphne, who'd been used by a backyard breeder and then shot and abandoned with a large tumor sticking out of her chest. I knew we could help each other. I adopted her and saw her through her cancer too--the tumor turned out to be exactly the same cancer Seamus had. But there was another beagle pulling at my heartstrings too. Percival had been rescued from an animal research laboratory by Beagle Freedom Project. He spent the first 18 years of his life in a steel cage, never seeing sunlight, playing with toys, or knowing human kindness or canine companionship. With a lot of love and attention he's now thriving, as is Daphne. Since cancer has been such an ominous force in our household, I've turned vegan for my health and for the animals. All I need to do is look at these adorable hounds and those big brown eyes to be reminded to strive for the most compassionate lifestyle I can. For the Animals!

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